We use cookies to offer the best possible user experience on our website. We also use third-party cookies, to deliver personalised advertisement messages. By using our website you agree, that cookies can be saved on your device. Further information on the cookies used and on how to disable them can be found here.
 
 
 
Interviews

A Portrait of the Architect and designer Lorenzo Bellini

STYLE REPORT:
Why do you, an architect by profession, prefer to create as a designer?
BELLINI:
I don’t believe that that is the case. I am an architect and I love to work with architecture. But it is not always so easy to work as an architect (the bureaucracy, the budgets, the time expenditures). Design has different timing, the fruit of the creativity can be examined within a short period of time. The control over the product is more immediate and can be presented with examples. Perhaps that is the reason why I am dedicating myself more and more to design. But I believe that everything that has to do with creativity fascinates me: even designing a sailboat.
STYLE REPORT:
Where does the inspiration come from for a new model (or a new collection)?
BELLINI:
In general, new models, objects, or furnishings are the result of a clearly defined process that refers to the market or to a furnishing project that is architecturally more expansive. The inspiration is based upon these preconditions and is constantly closely involved with a creative methodology that stems from thirty-five years of experience and constant “suffering”.
​STYLE REPORT:
What is your favorite material with which you like to work?
BELLINI:
I love all materials, I use all materials, preferably those with which the human hand (craftsmanship) is capable of providing a special value, an added value.
STYLE REPORT:
In your opinion, what does an artist’s “personal style” mean? Does it perhaps have something to do with a recognizable image?
BELLINI:
Some architects or designers effectively have an unmistakable style, recurring elements that are easily recognizable in their works But that is not true in my case. I think that in my works, a certain atmosphere is recognizable, a certain touch that cannot be defined in material terms but which is translated in effect into a sort of “label”.
STYLE REPORT:
What are you currently working on?
BELLINI:
I’m currently engaged in the architectural and interior design of around twenty hotel projects throughout the world, in the design of collections of furniture, upholstered furniture, lamps, fixtures, textiles, etc. It is a time of a great creative flurry for my studio.
STYLE REPORT:
Which of your project has provided you with the greatest satisfaction?
BELLINI:
All of my projects are a part of myself, no one outdoes another. My path is a continuous discussion of successive challenges, a continuous curiosity in taking different roads.
STYLE REPORT:
It is also said that the more interesting a collection is from the commercial standpoint, the more uninteresting it is for the artist. Do you agree?
BELLINI:
In general, I don’t agree, since I do not design in order to satisfy my ego, but rather to create objects, spaces, architectures that are directed at the user! My ego is satisfied if whoever uses these objects, spaces, and architectures appreciates their requirements and their functional and aesthetic content and – why not? – their economic content, too.
STYLE REPORT:
Who is your most severe critic? Whose opinion do you particularly pay attention to?
BELLINI:
In certain ways, it is my daughter: a criticism that is never declared but one whose weight I feel. The compliment or the appreciation that I consider to be most important is that of those who own, use or live in an environment that I conceived.
STYLE REPORT:
Is there a designer (or an architect) whom you appreciate more than all others? And if so, why?
BELLINI:
The people of reference during my past as a student have also remained my favorites to this day: Alvar Aalto and Arne Jacobsen. Even today, their design from the 1950s and 1960s is still exemplary for cleanness of forms that will outlast the trends: true immortal minimalism.
STYLE REPORT:
Is it true that all new things are just some truly forgotten things of the past?
BELLINI:
The past is a part of us. I think of new things as a synthesis of the new and the past reassessed in a contemporary transposition.
Write comment
 
A Portrait of the Architect and designer Lorenzo Bellini
A Portrait of the Architect and designer Lorenzo Bellini
A Portrait of the Architect and designer Lorenzo Bellini
A Portrait of the Architect and designer Lorenzo Bellini
 
 Back to list 
 
 
Your comment





Please enter the following characters in the text box


 Send comment 
 



DE | IT | EN | RU

 
Contact Selva Srl
Via Joseph Selva 307
37050 Isola Rizza - Italy
Phone +39 045 6999111

www.selva.com
VAT No. IT01409130216
 
Copia di NEWSLETTER
Subscribe here



 Subscribe 
 
News
ITB 2015 - Berlin
Once again this year, SELVA was represented as a sponsor of ...
 
 
© 2016 Selva Srl | Credits | Cookies | Privacy | Sitemap | General terms and conditions |  C.F.: 00233920230 - VAT No. IT01409130216
Capitale sociale Euro 50.000 int. vers. Reg. imprese CCIAA BZ008-16315 R.E.A. 73800
produced by Zeppelin Group - Internet Marketing